Marine Scribbles

Hold on to your Tridents

Posts tagged ocean

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Trivia Tuesday Answer

The heaviest fish is the Mola mola, or ocean sunfish, with an average weight of 1000 kg (2200 lbs for those not used to metric).  That’s huge.

They tend to bask on their side, creating a broad platform in the ocean.

Mola mola basking

Funny story about that.  We got talking about Mola mola during Ecology of Fish.  Our professor had a suggestion… “Jump on a mola mola like a trampoline. Won’t hurt them.”  The way he said it makes me think he’s done it…

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Trivia Tuesday Answer

Remember this question from last week?

What family of fish (common name is fine) was the first recorded deep sea anglerfish discovered?

Hint: J. C. H. Reinhardt was the first one to describe the genus in 1837.

Himantolophus groenlandicus

Such a pretty fish, eh?  That’s a football fish, Himantolophus groenlandicus.  Wouldn’t that be a fun thing to pull up instead of a flounder?

Thanks to all those folks who responded.  New question should be up at noon.

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Trivia Tuesdays

Back for more Trivia Tuesdays!  The answer will be up next week, so you’ve got plenty of time to hit up your friendly neighborhood Google if you don’t know the answer.

What family of fish (common name is fine) was the first recorded deep sea anglerfish discovered?

Hint: J. C. H. Reinhardt was the first one to describe the genus in 1837.

Good luck.  And remember, its a great time to hit up our Ask Box and send us questions as well.  We can answer anything from critters to tanks to why did we do this?

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Hey all.

Sorry about the lack of posts the past few weeks.  With the end of summer (and the end of summer jobs or the start of school) things have been rather hectic.  We will return to our normal schedule of posting when things settle down into an actual schedule again.  In the meantime, check out some of the other awesome marine blogs out there or pop us a message with things you’d like to see on the site.

Oh, and here’s a distraction from our lack of posting…

Octopus .gif

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Movies tend to make people get a bit crazy…it’s true. A lot of people love the movie Finding Nemo which spurred a crazy jump in clownfish sales. There suddenly wasn’t enough clownfish to go around and there was a worry over decreasing the population in the ocean (which is kind of ironic if you’ve ever seen the movie). This spurred enough interest and money that research could be done on how to get these guys to breed in captivity so that we’re not depleting the natural population. The exciting this is that it worked! Now most of the clownfish on the market are captive bred and not wild caught.
Clownfish have an interesting hierarchy, and will actually switch sex if need be. At the very top of the hierarchy is the female of the group (yes there is only one female) who is the biggest fish of the group and has the responsibility of breeding and defending territory. She chooses one male of the group and these two become the only breeding pair. The female will lay a large brood of eggs which both she and her mate will care for and guard until they hatch, after which the male usually stays and cares for the young until they reach sexual maturity. If the female dies then the breeding male then becomes female and chooses a new mate from the group of the non-breeding males that make up the rest of the population.   
So there it is…just a brief blib for Mating Monday. Hope you enjoyed it. If you have any suggestions on anything or if you want to learn about a particular organism feel free to comment or sent mail..love to hear from you guys!
for more information on clown fish go to http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/clownfish/ or http://www.aquariacentral.com/forums/showthread.php?110340-Breeding-Clownfish or http://www.breedclownfish.com/step-1-getting-a-breeding-pair-of-clownfish/

Movies tend to make people get a bit crazy…it’s true. A lot of people love the movie Finding Nemo which spurred a crazy jump in clownfish sales. There suddenly wasn’t enough clownfish to go around and there was a worry over decreasing the population in the ocean (which is kind of ironic if you’ve ever seen the movie). This spurred enough interest and money that research could be done on how to get these guys to breed in captivity so that we’re not depleting the natural population. The exciting this is that it worked! Now most of the clownfish on the market are captive bred and not wild caught.

Clownfish have an interesting hierarchy, and will actually switch sex if need be. At the very top of the hierarchy is the female of the group (yes there is only one female) who is the biggest fish of the group and has the responsibility of breeding and defending territory. She chooses one male of the group and these two become the only breeding pair. The female will lay a large brood of eggs which both she and her mate will care for and guard until they hatch, after which the male usually stays and cares for the young until they reach sexual maturity. If the female dies then the breeding male then becomes female and chooses a new mate from the group of the non-breeding males that make up the rest of the population.   

So there it is…just a brief blib for Mating Monday. Hope you enjoyed it. If you have any suggestions on anything or if you want to learn about a particular organism feel free to comment or sent mail..love to hear from you guys!

for more information on clown fish go to http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/clownfish/ or http://www.aquariacentral.com/forums/showthread.php?110340-Breeding-Clownfish or http://www.breedclownfish.com/step-1-getting-a-breeding-pair-of-clownfish/